Serif typeface

from The Temporary State
designed by Roman Gornitsky

3 Styles

3 Weights: Light to Bold

Additional Scripts

Cyrillic

Best for

  • Headings (display text)
  • Long reading text (body text)
  • User Interfaces (functional text)

License

Free

Specialty

A sharp and interesting alternative to Times New Roman with triangular serifs, a light weight, and beautiful in upper case.

My thoughts on Wremena

Last time I suggested an alternative to overused Roboto, this week I’ll present you with a fresh choice for the most widespread typeface of all, Times New Roman. Wremena caught my attention because of its beautiful light weight and the striking triangular serifs. Both give this free font a certain twist, something interesting, and out of the ordinary while not being too distracting.

The serif typeface Wremena in the weights Light, Regular, and Bold
By default Wremena comes with old style figures. But you can change them to lining numbers, like I did here.

The details are what makes Wremena so special. Look at the triangular serifs, the flag serifs at the top of the A, the sharp serif at the top left of the N, and in contrast the delightful drop shaped ear of the lower case g.

Showing details of the typeface Wremena compared to Times New Roman
Comparing the details of Wremena and Times New Roman. Times feels very usual in larger sizes with its bracketed serifs.

At large, these details also make the typeface more interesting for headings, and especially in all caps. I really enjoy looking at the Regular and Light weights. Bold seems less interesting, since the stems and serifs are less contrasting there.

Times New Roman is very ordinary: A little body text in Times & Wremena to compare it. Times is what we are used to, so this might be even invisible to us. Some details in Wremena stand out, especially the extending serif at the apex of the upper case A. It's also more contrasting, wider and a bit less balanced than Times. with the triangular serifs standing out. Not so much in the bold weight, Where the serifs blend in more.
I’m in love with Wremena Light in all caps (middle)!

Side by side compared to Times New Roman you can see, that Wremena is fresher, wider, but also a little less balanced. Vertical letters like the y and the w feel a bit too short, not so sure why.

Times New Roman is very ordinary: A little body text in Times & Wremena to compare it. Times is what we are used to, so this might be even invisible to us. Some details in Wremena stand out, especially the extending serif at the apex of the upper case A. It's also more contrasting, wider and a bit less balanced than Times.
Wremena gives it a fresher look: A little body text in Times & Wremena to compare it. Times is what we are used to, so this might be even invisible to us. Some details in Wremena stand out, especially the extending serif at the apex of the upper case A. It's also more contrasting, wider and a bit less balanced than Times.

Next time you look for a cool alternative to Times New Roman that’s not that far away, give Wremena a try! Use it in slightly larger sizes and avoid it for anything below 16 px, where it would become too delicate.


What do you think? Is this typeface something for an upcoming project, or do you have a font recommendation? Tell me in the comments below!

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5 Comments

  1. Well, well, Wremena, or in my language Vremena means Times’ – time but plural, anyway Roman😄

    This is ou so nice surprise. You’re right about the small w, it’s short 🤔 but it’s not ruining Wremena’s elegance and nobility. This is a serious font! I can’t believe it’s free. So much dignity yet not inaccessible or cold. It’s a mature type.

    I like the bold option when in combination with regular and light, it gets dynamic. And all caps are striking-strong attitude bold. Look at the word Wremena, letters – mild ocean waves.

    I see its use in some historical, societal, political organization. Definitely saving it to my archive of favorites!

    Have you reviewed Vollkorn?

    1. Oh, now this makes perfect sense! It’s from a Russian type designer, of course! Those are all good applications, Jana. It definitely is something serious.

      No, I have not reviewed Vollkorn yet. I tend to avoid the super popular Google Fonts, but it’s a very friendly typeface!

  2. Hi Oliver!
    Thanks for the recommendation.
    I’ll use this font for a lawyer website, I’ll share the result with you as soon as I finish the website.

    Best!

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